How Much EGCG Is In Matcha Green Tea

Matcha has a long history dating all the way back to the Tang Dynasty. During this time period, tea leaves were made into bricks. This method resulted in easier tea harvests, as well as being easier to transport and trade.

The EGCG content in Matcha has been shown to reduce inflammation, support weight loss, and help prevent heart and brain disease.

Whether you prefer to prepare this drink traditionally or get it at your local tea shop, adding it as part of your health routine surely will bring a lot of healing benefits. 

What Is EGCG? 

Epigallocatechin gallate (EGCG) is a unique plant compound called catechin. EGCG works as an antioxidant to help reduce inflammation, support weight loss, and help prevent heart and brain disease.

EGCG is best known for its role as the major active compound found in green tea, specifically Matcha Green tea.

The health benefits associated with drinking green tea come from consuming EGCG.

EGCG exists naturally in several foods like:

  • Cranberries
  • Strawberries
  • Blackberries
  • Kiwis 
  • Cherries
  • Pears
  • Peaches
  • Apples
  • Avocados 

But is also available as a dietary supplement usually sold in the form of an extract. However, be cautious if you choose to supplement EGCG as there are side effects. These include possible kidney failure, liver failure, dizziness, low blood sugar, and anemia.

How Much EGCG Is In Matcha Green Tea?

matcha powder and tea

Consumer Lab reports EGCG in a typical cup of matcha contains 100/110 to 200/220 mg, whereas they found that a typical cup of green tea contains 40-80 mg (the range is from 1 to 2 teaspoons).

The amount of EGCG will vary depending on the quality of Matcha you make as well as how much you’re using per cup. 

In addition to this, because you are consuming the whole tea leaf when drinking Matcha, you will naturally get more antioxidants than traditional green tea. 

Does Matcha Have More EGCG Than Regular Green Tea?

A typical cup of green tea contains 40-80 mg (the range is from 1 to 2 teaspoons) of EGCG.

The amount of EGCG will vary depending on the quality of Matcha you make as well as how much you’re using per cup. 

Regular green tea is grown primarily in direct sunlight right up until the day it’s harvested.

Matcha on the other hand, is kept in the shade for the final 2-3 weeks before harvesting. The lack of sunlight triggers the plant to produce more chlorophyll, resulting in higher concentrations of EGCG compared to green tea.

Unlike regular green tea, matcha is steamed and then stone-ground into a fine powder.

Regular green tea is made by steeping the dried leaves in hot water for 30-45 seconds, or even up to a minute, then straining the liquid and removing the leaves.

Matcha tea is prepared by mixing 1-2 teaspoons of matcha powder in a small amount of hot water using a traditional bamboo whisk, then whisking it back and forth until foamy. 

So even though both come from the same plant, the shade harvesting and growing method results in higher concentrations of EGCG in Matcha. 

Conclusion

Matcha green tea has many health benefits and can be a great addition to your self-care routine. There’s really no reason not to give matcha a try!

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